Professor John Braithwaite

John Braithwaite is a Professor of the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet). For 13 years he has been leading a project called Peacebuilding Compared which, among other things, aims to explore the relationship between war and crime across all the major armed conflicts since the end of the Cold War. He is best known for work on the ideas of restorative justice and responsive regulation.

Plenary title: Macrocriminology and the Role of Capital

Abstract:

I am working on a project called Macrocriminology. It is partly about the relationship between Capital and Crime. This presentation first considers financial capital, then human capital, social capital, recovery capital and restorative capital. Crime prevention requires the creation of more of these forms of capital. It also requires changes in their distribution. For example, without constant growth of financial capital, long-term unemployment results, and this is a crime risk. Yet, some shifts from private to public capital are also needed. An example is that the European Union should have established a public European ratings agency to contest the fraud of the major US private ratings agencies that we saw during the Global Financial Crisis. The crimes of Deutsche Bank during the GFC could have been sanctioned by capital punishment - an equity fine in shares of the company - rather than a massive cash fine.

Averting global warming catastrophe will not be achieved so much by punishing environmental criminals as by shifting capital from carbon to solar, cars from petrol power to electric power. Then the crimes of corporations like VW become less important. This presentation is therefore about how to stimulate and steer the right kind of growth in financial, human, social, recovery and restorative capital to secure a society with less predatory crime, from environmental crime to homicide and domestic violence.

Key Dates

Friday 23rd June 2017

Conference registration closes

Now closed

Monday 30th January 2017

Call for abstracts

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Monday 30th January 2017

Early bird registration opens

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Friday 12th May 2017

Early bird registration closes

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Friday 26th May 2017

Call for abstracts closes

Now closed