Professor Simon Winlow

Simon Winlow is Professor of Criminology at the Teesside Centre for Realist Criminology. He is the author of Badfellas: Crime, Tradition and New Masculinities (2001, Berg), and co-author of Bouncers: Violence and Governance in the Night-time Economy (2003, Oxford University Press), Violent Night: Urban Leisure and Contemporary Culture (2006, Berg), Criminal Identities and Consumer Culture: Crime, Exclusion and the New Culture of Narcissism (2008, Willan), Rethinking Social Exclusion: The Death of the Social? (2013, Sage), Riots and Political Protest: Notes from the Post-Political Present (2015, Routledge), Revitalizing Criminological Theory: Towards a New Ultra-Realism (2015, Routledge) and Rise of the Right: English Nationalism and the Transformation of Working-Class Politics (2017, Policy Press). He is currently working on a critical history of left-wing politics in Britain and the United States of America.

Plenary title: The Rise of the Right

Abstract:

In the decades that followed World War II, it seemed impossible that we would ever again tarry with the regressive politics of fascism. However, in the past decade we have seen the rise of nationalism, and it is entirely possible that we are about to embark upon a new era of European fascism.

While the liberal backlash against nationalism and the new forms of racism that are attached to it are entirely appropriate, it is incumbent upon social scientists to try to understand the fundamental causes of these new political trends, and the context of their emergence. In this presentation, I will offer a digest of our recent research with white working-class men and women who support a variety of far right political groups. Why is the far right growing in areas previously dominated by the politics of democratic socialism? Why is it that so many poor, insecurely employed men and women - who worry about the disintegration of their neighbourhoods and the economic prospects of their children - see no efficacy in the current politics of the left?

Quite clearly, it is imperative that the left reattaches itself to the multi-ethnic working class, and place its economic interests right at the core of its project. If it does not, the right will continue to capitalise on the blind anger and frustration that exists in such abundance in the West's areas of permanent recession.

Key Dates

Friday 23rd June 2017

Conference registration closes

Now closed

Monday 30th January 2017

Call for abstracts

Now closed

Monday 30th January 2017

Early bird registration opens

Now closed

Friday 12th May 2017

Early bird registration closes

Now closed

Friday 26th May 2017

Call for abstracts closes

Now closed